First Jemimah Meetup


On Wednesday 30th January, I met with a group of professional and business women (approximately fifteen). The mission? To cast the Jemimah vision and obtain feedback. It was a success and the ladies had fun. Interestingly, a couple of married friends attended and were able to give some interesting perspectives and insights PLUS mind blowing real life stories: not all that glitters is gold.

While eating, drinking and chatting, we all agreed that single women in Nigeria are considered to be at the bottom of the human strata i.e. married men first, then single men, then married women and finally single women. I was quite shocked when one of the ladies then proceeded to equate “cancer” to “single woman”. She said both are unspoken in the Nigerian palate. Someone dies of cancer, no one uses the word cancer when referring to cause of death. Someone is a single woman of a certain age, no one wants to mention the word single. Another lady mentioned to her friend that she was off to a Jemimah meetup. Once her friend found out the purpose of Jemimah, she asked why she was bothering to go. You’ll often hear people say of single women: ‘that isn’t your portion!’ Meaning don’t label yourself ‘single’ since you are trusting God for a husband
My thoughts: this is not something one can hide or deny long term, so why not embrace it and live your life, while waiting for loverboy husband to turn up?

Then there was the animated discussion of the potential challenges of online dating in a nation where men are allowed to date/marry multiple women. How do we ensure security on the site and protect the interests of signed up members? Looking for professional software/application developers who would be excited and willing to work with us on a project to build this site.

Final Thought – how do we sell the idea of Jemimah without people thinking ‘single’?

If you have any ideas and/or comments please feedback or email me at infoATiamjemimah.com

J

Born in the 60s


Born in the 60s, the era of feminism and burning of bras. Some of our mothers are those women who fought for independence and gave women the right become whomever they chose to be. Not entirely a bad thing considering women were shackled to their men back in the day and their voices largely unheard. Coming from such stock, it shouldn’t be a surprise that the children of such women would go on to become career women, entrepreneurs and even moguls of large empires! Who said women can’t have it all? Or can they?

Getting to the top may mean sacrificing a few things along the way e.g. a social life, a husband or partner, children, family. Some may ask the burning question: ‘Is it worth the sacrifice?’ For some, the answer may be a resounding ‘Yes’, Some ‘No’ and others ‘Maybe’. My view, is that at every point in one’s life, sacrifices need to be made. In the earlier years, it may be family; in the latter years, it may be career but in the end, everyone needs someone to come home to, to love and be loved.